• Summer 2017 | Solar Eclipse, South America, FJ Summit, MORE!

    Another amazing issue! Read More
  • Winter 2017 | Toroweap, New Zealand, GX-470, More!

    Click to read NOW! Read More
  • Spring 2017 | Bears Ears, Installs, Overland Expo!

    Your Toyota Adventure Awaits! Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 1
  • 2

Latest Headlines

  • Hema Explorer-Clear Lake

    Hema Explorer-Clear Lake

    What do you do when you’ve explored every FJ Summit trail in the Ouray-Silverton-Telluride area multiple times? Find something new. The Hema Explorer system helped to scout a high alpine Read More
  • 4Runner Preparation (Eclipse Expedition)

    4Runner Preparation (Eclipse Expedition)

    The goal was to escape the August Texas heat and land me in an ideal spot for the solar eclipse. My plan was to start in Colorado by hitting sections Read More
  • Cooper ST MAXX Long Term Review

    Cooper ST MAXX Long Term Review

    We have had an on-again, off-again relationship with Cooper Tires ever since we purchased our 1998 4Runner in 2006. We initially ran a set of their Adventurer A/T and a Read More
  • To New Beginnings - Our GX-460

    To New Beginnings - Our GX-460

    "You know you’d love another project, you need one." —Angie Williams  More true words have never been spoken. If you’ve followed our publication for long you’ll know that we've always Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

4Runner

Toyota Trucks

FJ Cruiser

Toyota Overland

Land Cruiser

Toyota Videos

TCT Article Map


Click for Full Screen

connect

facebook-logo  google-logo  twitter-logo  youtube-logo

pinterest-logo  flickr-logo  instagram-logo  linkedin-logo

Latest Toyota Magazine Articles

  • 1

Get Toyota Cruisers & Trucks Magazine on the Google Play Store!Get Toyota Cruisers & Trucks Magazine on the App Store

Outdoor Retailer turned a new page this past July as we saw its last show in Salt Lake City. It was a bittersweet trip for me as I drove over to Utah from Wyoming. Krista and I have been covering both OR’s Summer and Winter Markets since 2010. I know this pales in comparison to the 21 years Outdoor Retailer has graced the halls of the Salt Palace Convention Center but one cannot help but be a little nostalgic about the whole thing. We “grew up” in this outdoor editorial field while attending the shows in Salt Lake so part of me feels like we will be leaving home when the shows move to Denver, starting in January 2018.


Outdoor Retailer Summer 2017

Those manufacturers that chose to attend did so with some phenomenal gear. Although there wasn’t a clear ‘must have’ item, as we saw when standup paddle boards first came to the market, there were several items that caught our eye. Here are our top products from this year’s Summer Market.

LifeSaver Jerrycan 20,000UF

A robust and portable water filter capable of filtering 20,000 litres/5,282 US gallons of clean drinking water, removing viruses, bacteria, cysts and parasites instantly. The LifeSaver Jerrycan holds up to 18.5 litres of water at any one time and is designed to support those with a greater demand for clean water such as group expeditions, adventurers embarking on overland travel, families or those setting themselves up for off-grid living. MSRP: $224.96 URL: https://www.iconlifesaver.com/product/lifesaver-jerrycan-20000uf

Gerber Center-Drive w/ Bit Set

Gerber’s new multi-tool offers uncompromising performance through revolutionary design. The innovative center-axis driver opens to align like a real screw driver, yielding maximum torque and rotation. No productivity is sacrificed with the addition of a 30% longer outboard blade and one-thumb opening sliding jaws. Full size, real tools - the multi-tool just got a reality check. MSRP: $132URL: http://www.gerbergear.com/Activity/EVERYDAY/Center-Drive-w-Bit-Set_30-001194

Thermacell Backpacker Repeller

The Backpacker Repeller will be powered by camping gas canisters, such as butane propane mix, and will work with all leading brands. It uses an integrated Piezo lighter to heat the allethrin inflused Thermacell repellent mats, creating an odorless and invisible Zone of Protection. Allethrin is a copy of a natural repellent found in chrysanthemum flowers, which repels mosquitos, black flies and no-see-ums and is an alternative to DEET, which can ruin gear and irritate human skin. MSRP: $39.99URL: https://www.thermacell.com/products/mosquito-repellents/backpacker/backpacker-mosquito-repeller

Coleman Northern Nova

Fill your entire campground with light with the brightest Coleman® lantern, the Northern Nova™ Propane Lantern with Case. The patented tube-mantles shine brighter than standard versions, and this lantern doubles up on that brightness technology to produce 3000 lumens of light that reach up to 32.5 meters away. When you're ready to head home, the legs fold up for more compact storage in the included case until you're ready for your next bright adventure. MSRP: $149.99URL: https://www.coleman.com/northern-nova-propane-lantern/2000023099.html

myCharge AdventureUltra

The AdventureUltra is myCharge’s largest battery bank with the highest power output. Designed to replace the heavy and bulky generators used when tailgating or camping, the AdventureUltra is a more streamlined power source option that can run a 42-inch television for up to three hours. The compact device weighs 1.05 pounds and measures just 1.2 X 5.8 X 4.1 inches. The AdventureUltra has a maximum power output of 45 watts, enough to run a laptop or recharge a drone battery. MSRP: $129.99URL: https://mycharge.com/collections/adventure-series/products/adventureultra

Pelican 24-Can Soft Cooler

Offering a convenient and lightweight alternative to hard coolers, The Pelican™ Elite Soft Cooler is ADVENTURE READY. This 24-Can Soft Cooler is durable, easy to carry, waterproof, leakproof and keeps ice for up to 48 hours. Strap it on your kayak, stand up paddle board, ATV/UTV or take it with you on your next hike to the beach or lake. All Elite Soft Coolers feature a quick access dual-lock buckle system, 100% Leak proof TIZIP® Zipper, compression molded anti-slip base, and stainless steel tie-down and bottle openers. MSRP: $279.99URL: http://www.pelican.com/us/en/explore/soft-coolers/

CampMaid 12” Outdoor Cookout Grill Set

Quite possibly the Swiss Army Knife of Dutch oven cooking. Outfit your Overland vehicles with the CampMaid cooking tools pack - the ultimate compact outdoor camp kitchen that transforms into multiple uses - a smoker, pizza oven, grill, griddle, steamer, baking, & more! The 12” Outdoor Cookout Grill Set includes CampMaid’s patented 12' Lid Holder & Serving Stand, Flip Grill, Charcoal/Wood Holder Heat Source, KickStand, Charcoal Chimney, pre-seasoned Dutch oven and carry bags. MSRP: $215.99URL: https://campmaid.com/collections/campmaid-overland/products/8-piece-complete-outdoor-cooking-system

Watershed Yukon Duffle

The Yukon duffel is the ideal size bag for 2-5 day river expeditions. There is room for a summer-weight sleeping bag, tent and some gear, or it could be used in tandem with other Watershed bags for food storage on a group trip. The bag also makes a great comprehensive ditch bag for long range marine use. MSRP: $159 URL: http://www.drybags.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Session_ID=e0868dd6a425fe6e0154f7ce644fce92&Screen=PROD&Store_Code=D&Product_Code=FGW-YUK&Category_Code=Duffels

  • To get your copy of the

    Summer 2017 Issue:

    download_now
    printed copyw
    read online

     FIND US ON:

    Twitter | Facebook

    ??? Ad 

     

    Get Toyota Cruisers & Trucks Magazine on the Google Play Store!Get Toyota Cruisers & Trucks Magazine on the App Store

    A few years ago, sitting at my desk job playing on the internet; I stumbled upon the blog of a couple traveling south on the Pan-American highway in a first generation 4Runner. The more I read, the more excited I became at the possibility of such a trip.  I went home and shared the dream with my girlfriend (now fiancée) Leah. That evening we became lost in the magic of an adventure of this magnitude, and our minds began to whirl as our future goals changed. Over the next couple of months, as the enormity of the trip sunk in, we realized that we would need a lot of time to plan and save to pull off such an endeavor. Leah was just about to start a two-year MBA program, and I was nearing a career change. We forecasted our budget, crunched the numbers, and realized that we could be debt free and have our required funds ready by the end of her MBA program. After a few months of intensive research and the beginning stages of saving; we were well on our way to our Pan-American Highway adventure that would take us from Denver to Ushuaia.


    Adventure Travel South of the Border

    Earlier that year I had purchased our 2004 Toyota 4Runner for camping, off-roading, and as my daily driver. Since the 4Runner is such a reliable and well-built vehicle, we knew it would be the perfect vehicle for an overland trip. As our budget allowed, I started to purchase the desired suspension and various other upgrades that we would need. Since the 4Runner had just over 100,000 miles, I rebuilt most of the front suspension and changed the stock front shocks to 2.5” Sway-A-Way coil-overs and SPC upper control arms. The rear suspension was changed to MetalTech4x4’s version of long travel suspension with custom built control arms. Since much of our driving would be highway, we decided that a tall, skinny tire would be the best option to help with fuel consumption while still performing well off-road. The tire of choice was the 33” Cooper S/T Maxx because of the unique size and the semi-aggressive treadpattern that would be able to handle any type of terrain.

    Adventure Travel South of the Border

    At times building an overland vehicle on a strict budget can get very frustrating; such as the large price tag on a rear bumper with a spare tire swing out. With prices hovering around $2,000, we had to discard the dream of the new beautiful steel bumpers.  Instead, I drew up some plans and custom made one specific to our needs, saving us $1500. I also made and installed a full set of drawers with easy access from the back that would also allow us to sleep inside if necessary, all the while keeping an extra seat for a third traveler.  We did invest in a Tepui rooftop tent, which has made for a very comfortable home in nearly all types of weather and has been by far one of the best investments we have made for this trip. I built and installed a 100W solar and dual battery system to power up our 43-quart refrigerator and to keep us self-sufficient in remote places. The build turned out to be a reliable and comfortable setup, and hopefully tough enough for the grueling 30,000 miles of paved, potholed, dirt and sand roads ahead.

    Adventure Travel South of the Border

    The 4Runner has been a great vehicle for us on this trip. Except for Mexico (which doesn’t sell 4Runners), we have felt confident that in the event we encounter a problem, we would be able to find and replace parts. We have come across all types of roads and all types of weather along this trip. The 4Runner has powered through every type of terrain with such grace that it almost makes the trip seem, dare I say, easy. Mudslides that have stood in our way, hundreds of miles of dirt roads & sandy beaches, there was even a road in southern Mexico that had in excess 300 speedbumps in 150 kilometers! All of which the 4Runner has made its way through with relative ease. 

    Adventure Travel South of the Border

    We have been to some pretty amazing places so far on this trip, but there are really a handful that stick out in our memory. In Mexico, Chichen Itza was a great visit. We also enjoyed just about every cenote that we dove into, especially the one in the town of Valladolid.

    If you were to ask us what beaches we would recommend, well we would have to ask, what are you looking for? If you’re looking for the surf culture, then the Pacific beaches of El Salvador are for you.  If you’re looking to scuba and snorkel, we would point you in the direction of the Caribbean coast because of its clear blue water and tremendous reefs. One of the most clean and beautiful countries in all Central America is Costa Rica. The parks are very pretty and full of wildlife, the beaches are clean and free of trash, and the lakes are top notch since there are not hundreds of speed boats zipping back and forth all day long. The greatest city that crossed our path in Central America was undoubtedly Panama City, Panama. The cityscape is one of the most amazing scene from the docks of Panama Bay, which is south of the city off a small strip of land. This city was very clean and well planned, which is something every trip navigator will appreciate, although traffic is an absolute nightmare. 

    Adventure Travel South of the Border

    One of the best aspects of this trip that was unexpected was the relationships that we would forge with other overlanders. When you meet another overlander – the connection is automatic.  You immediately fall into deep conversation and form a bond as if you have known each other for years. It is these spontaneous relationships with other overlanders that has given shape to our trip. Prior to leaving, we believed that we would have a plan of what and where we would be a month out.  This view changed very quickly.

    The best example is how we spent this past Christmas. We were headed across the border to Belize, when we started talking with another overlanding couple and, decided on the spot to join them for the Holiday.  This involved driving three days to Lake Atitlán in Guatemala, where we celebrated with eight couples from eight different countries. We came together, shared our favorite dishes from home and shared stories until the early hours of the morning. Since then we have traveled on and off with these same overlanders.

    Adventure Travel South of the Border

    The only regret we have is that both of us should have taken our Spanish lessons more seriously. Don’t get me wrong, we have made it a long way with our broken Spanish, but we completely miss out on being able to connect with locals on a deep and meaningful level.  We have had to rely on our overlanding friends who speak fluent Spanish, or the grace of the locals with whom we are trying to communicate. 

    Adventure Travel South of the Border

    For those who dream of a trip like this, we have but one piece of advice for you... Do it! If we have learned one thing on this trip, it is that the world is continually changing and not always for the better. Experience it while you can, learn to explore and adventure will unfold at every turn, including learning a lot about yourself.  If you are afraid of what lies beyond our borders, let us tell you that we feel just as safe on the road as we would in any national park in the United States. People south of the US border have been friendly, helpful and generous.

    A major topic around the overland campfire is the issue of bribes. We do our research prior to entering a new country; we try our best to follow the letter of the law and are respectful to any officer that we come across. We are firm believers that being polite and giving a big smile are all you need, and of course the proper documents to get out of any situation bribe free. Early in our trip we had the pleasure to meet a couple that has been on the road since the early 90’s; the best advice I took away from our lengthy conversations was that the best tool you have in non-ideal situations is time. As an overlander you must be patient, and willing to go with the flow.

    You can follow their adventures on their website and Instagram site: 

    https://4runner4adventure.com

    https://www.instagram.com/4runner4adventure/

  • To get your copy of the

    Summer 2017 Issue:

    download_now
    printed copyw
    read online

     FIND US ON:

    Twitter | Facebook

    ARB web intensity oct17 

    Get Toyota Cruisers & Trucks Magazine on the Google Play Store!Get Toyota Cruisers & Trucks Magazine on the App Store

    With sunlight fading, we pushed the accelerator closer to the floor. Our perfect campsite was still several miles away on the shores of Lake Powell. We needed to get there before dark.  The narrow, overgrown trail allowed for good speed but hid rocks and ruts that could cause serious damage at speeds.


    Slinky Stage 4

    I was clipping along in my 80 series, at almost 70 mph through the sage and yucca, when cresting a rise I found myself nearly on top of the next big bump with no time to scrub speed.  I got light in my seat. The truck left the ground briefly.  There was now a long straight section of trail mostly obscured by desert grass.  I mashed the throttle and the needle passed 70.  Just as I felt confident to keep accelerating a deep, sharp ditch across the trail came into view through the grass.  Again too late to drop speeds, I accelerated to try to get the truck to carry across the gap instead of hitting a low point.  I prepped myself for a big hit.  I was clipping along in my 80 series, at almost 70 mph through the sage and yucca, when cresting a rise I found myself nearly on top of the next big bump with no time to scrub speed.  I got light in my seat. The truck left the ground briefly.  There was now a long straight section of trail mostly obscured by desert grass.  I mashed the throttle and the needle passed 70.  Just as I felt confident to keep accelerating a deep, sharp ditch across the trail came into view through the grass.  Again too late to drop speeds, I accelerated to try to get the truck to carry across the gap instead of hitting a low point.  I prepped myself for a big hit.

    As time slowed my mind considered all of the parts in the front end that were going to be broken. Bang! The distinct noise was not as bad as I expected. Even more shocking: other than the noise, the truck didn’t disintegrate.  I slowed to a stop to check the damage.  No bent steering. Control arms still straight.  Nothing leaking.  The suspension seemed to just grin at me, mockingly saying, "is that all you’ve got?"

    A year earlier I had upgraded the suspension on my 80 to a new kit coming out of Australia.  The Stage 1 Slinky Long Travel kit.  I was intrigued by the tapered wire, dual rate coils, and the Australian spec ICON 2.0 shocks.  Fast forward 12 months later and I had almost 20k miles on this suspension from daily driving, to 7-8,000 off-road miles of slow speed rock crawling and high speed desert running.  If you want to find out what I thought about the Stage 1 Kit, take a look back at the Summer 2016 Issue of TCT Magazine and you’ll find my review.  In sum, I believe the Slinky kits are the best all-around performance suspension available for the 80 series when considering bolt-on kits and not going full custom. A year earlier I had upgraded the suspension on my 80 to a new kit coming out of Australia.  The Stage 1 Slinky Long Travel kit.  I was intrigued by the tapered wire, dual rate coils, and the Australian spec ICON 2.0 shocks.  Fast forward 12 months later and I had almost 20k miles on this suspension from daily driving, to 7-8,000 off-road miles of slow speed rock crawling and high speed desert running.  If you want to find out what I thought about the Stage 1 Kit, take a look back at the Summer 2016 Issue of TCT Magazine and you’ll find my review.  In sum, I believe the Slinky kits are the best all-around performance suspension available for the 80 series when considering bolt-on kits and not going full custom.

    Back to the story that I started with... we were on our third day of a product testing trip. We had several hundred off-road miles from St. George to Moab, UT, with Darren McRae, of Autocraft the creator of the Slinky kits, and US distributor counterparts. We also had a handful of Slinky customers or prospective customers.  Before the trip, we visited IH8MUD headquarters just outside of St. George to use Woody’s shop lift so I could upgrade my suspension yet again.  This time I was stepping up from the Stage 1 to the Stage 4 shocks.

    I want to focus on the differences and pros and cons to the different Slinky shock options. The Stage 1 shocks are an ICON 2.0 smooth body IFP shock that has been valved and tuned by Darren specifically for the 80 series. For those looking to get to another level of performance with their 80, but still need to fit in a budget, these Stage 1 2.0 shocks are the best smooth body shocks I’ve experienced in my 20 years of 80 series ownership.I want to focus on the differences and pros and cons to the different Slinky shock options. The Stage 1 shocks are an ICON 2.0 smooth body IFP shock that has been valved and tuned by Darren specifically for the 80 series.  For those looking to get to another level of performance with their 80, but still need to fit in a budget, these Stage 1 2.0 shocks are the best smooth body shocks I’ve experienced in my 20 years of 80 series ownership.

    In contrast, the Stage 4 ICON shocks are a 2.5 remote reservoir (front) and a 2.5 piggy back reservoir (rear) that, when combined with the Slinky Long Travel coils, create the triple threat setup.  A number of things make the Stage 4 shocks unique and different from the Stage 1’s.  First, it starts with a ͞flutter stack͟ in the valving to allow some movement of the shock shaft before full valving sets in.  This provides a supple ride with a higher fast piston speed valving code.  Think of corrugated roads when you haven’t aired down your tires from 45psi, no fun right?  Not anymore.  With the Slinky shocks, washboard roads now feel smooth and you wonder where that buzzing noise from the bumps is coming from.

    Second, the Stage 4 shocks have adjustable Compression Dampening Control (͞CDC͟).  The CDC secondary piston and valve stack stops the pintle style, restrictive ͞90 psi in the tires͟ feeling on sharp bumps when road driving and are typically less than half the line pressure of other adjustable shocks at fast piston speeds.  There are 8 different adjustability settings. Changing the setting is a simple turn of a dial. Stage 1 shocks are the equivalent of a setting of 4 on the Stage 4 CDC adjustment dial.No tools are needed, so it’s easy to make changes and dial in your ride for different conditions or vehicle loads in a matter of seconds. Second, the Stage 4 shocks have adjustable Compression Dampening Control (͞CDC͟).  The CDC secondary piston and valve stack stops the pintle style, restrictive ͞90 psi in the tires͟ feeling on sharp bumps when road driving and are typically less than half the line pressure of other adjustable shocks at fast piston speeds.  There are 8 different adjustability settings. Changing the setting is a simple turn of a dial. Stage 1 shocks are the equivalent of a setting of 4 on the Stage 4 CDC adjustment dial.No tools are needed, so it’s easy to make changes and dial in your ride for different conditions or vehicle loads in a matter of seconds. 

    Third, the Stage 4 Slinky shocks have a built in hydro bump zone at fast piston speed for when the piston goes past the top manifold.  What does all this mean for the average dude that isn’t a suspension engineer?  It means a dramatic increase in vehicle control and comfort not only on the road but in rough terrain. Both kits are available either in 50mm or 75mm lift heights with intermediate or heavy coil spring rates.  The shocks are a full 12͟ of travel, and the coils have a taller free height to stay seated in the coil buckets even at the limit of flex.  There is a full compliment of supporting components like adjustable track bars (panhards) and heavy duty rear lower control arms and adjustable upper control arms, along with brake lines and caster correction options to get everything set up correctly. 

    During the course of our testing trip we had vehicles with Stage 1 Slinky suspension, Stage 4 Slinky suspension, and without Slinky suspension.  We needed to cover a lot of miles in a short few days in order to get to Cruise Moab on time. We travelled fast.  The vehicles that were not Slinky equipped were unable to keep pace with the other trucks.  In trying to keep up, all non-Slinky equipped trucks had varying degrees of shock fade, with some having total shock failure.  This slowed them down even more as there was essentially no suspension dampening at all until the shocks cooled.  With the Slinky Stage 4 shocks, and piggy back and remote reservoirs there is enough oil in the shocks that it is virtually impossible to run them hard enough for a long enough amount of time to create any shock fade.  So, long off-road trips like this at high speeds are no big deal.  Not only is the truck less fatigued, but you as the driver are less fatigued after a long day on the trail.

    The excellent valving and adjustability of the Stage 4 shocks provides an entirely new level of confidence when driving an 80 series at higher speeds on rough terrain.  I stopped even thinking about rocks any smaller than a basketball in the trail.  The shocks just soaked them up.  Catching some air off that crest? No problem.  If you own an 80 series you know that they are heavy trucks right off the lot.  When built up with bumpers, winches, bigger tires, roof racks, rooftop tents, fridges, drawers and all the camping gear you bring along for days on the trail exploring and camping, they get significantly heavier.When you start to push speeds in an built 80 the truck will lean and wallow through corners. It can be unnerving to say the least.You also find your bump stops regularly when travelling fast.  That is just not the case with the Slinky suspension.   The excellent valving and adjustability of the Stage 4 shocks provides an entirely new level of confidence when driving an 80 series at higher speeds on rough terrain.  I stopped even thinking about rocks any smaller than a basketball in the trail. The shocks just soaked them up.  Catching some air off that crest? No problem.  If you own an 80 series you know that they are heavy trucks right off the lot.  When built up with bumpers, winches, bigger tires, roof racks, rooftop tents, fridges, drawers and all the camping gear you bring along for days on the trail exploring and camping, they get significantly heavier.When you start to push speeds in an built 80 the truck will lean and wallow through corners. It can be unnerving to say the least.You also find your bump stops regularly when travelling fast. That is just not the case with the Slinky suspension.  

    With my truck fully loaded and carrying one of the heavier roof tents on the market I was comfortably and confidently driving speeds in the dirt that far exceeded any speeds I would have ever attempted, even with an empty truck prior to having the Slinky suspension.  It would have been quite nerve-wracking to drive like that with other commonly used suspensions.

    In conclusion.  I spent a year with the Stage 1 shocks and was very happy with them.  The limitations of the Stage 1 shocks become evident at higher speeds.  I would occasionally ͞overrun͟ the Stage 1 shocks and bottom out through big bumps.  The Stage 1 shocks are fantastic for relatively lightweight 80s that aren’t burdened by lots of extra weight from modifications and gear.  But if you’re 80 has more than say a front bumper, a winch and some sliders you may want to consider stepping up to the Stage 4’s.They will handle the weight and give you the ability to make adjustments for when your truck is unloaded for daily driving or when it’s fully stacked for that two week trip down the Baja peninsula.  They will give you the confidence to know that when you run out of talent like I did in the story I began this article with, the suspension will soak up your mistakes, whether it’s a smooth landing or surprise hole in the trail.There is serious technology and engineering behind the Slinky suspension systems. It was developed specifically for the 80 series.  These kits have been tested and proven in Australia for years and it’s exciting to have these kits as an option for us here in the US.   In conclusion.  I spent a year with the Stage 1 shocks and was very happy with them.  The limitations of the Stage 1 shocks become evident at higher speeds.  I would occasionally ͞overrun͟ the Stage 1 shocks and bottom out through big bumps.  The Stage 1 shocks are fantastic for relatively lightweight 80s that aren’t burdened by lots of extra weight from modifications and gear.  But if you’re 80 has more than say a front bumper, a winch and some sliders you may want to consider stepping up to the Stage 4’s.They will handle the weight and give you the ability to make adjustments for when your truck is unloaded for daily driving or when it’s fully stacked for that two week trip down the Baja peninsula.  They will give you the confidence to know that when you run out of talent like I did in the story I began this article with, the suspension will soak up your mistakes, whether it’s a smooth landing or surprise hole in the trail.There is serious technology and engineering behind the Slinky suspension systems. It was developed specifically for the 80 series.  These kits have been tested and proven in Australia for years and it’s exciting to have these kits as an option for us here in the US.   

    If you are looking for top tier suspension performance for your Cruiser, I think this just might be the best.Slinky kits are currently available through Redline Land Cruisers and other US dealers are coming soon.

  • To get your copy of the

    Summer 2017 Issue:

    download_now
    printed copyw
    read online

     FIND US ON:

    Twitter | Facebook

    BajaRack TCT2017

     

    Page 4 of 283